Cactus Music

Wieland Wagner's "Siegfried" live in Bayreuth (1955)Modl is present from the very first note, and, just for a moment, Wagner's idea of the union of man and woman into the perfect human being seems to have become reality. Brunnhilde's visions of fear are then of oppressive intensity, followed by moments of peaceful illusion and elemental power, before she unconditionally relinquishes her divinity. In her autobiography So war mein Weg, Modl confesses that the Siegfried-Brunnhilde interplay was the most difficult role she experienced in the entire Ring: "The part is short, but it is always a third above my register. I had to be particularly careful", something she had to do most of the time. What Wieland Wagner appreciated about her was that "her singing, personality, and acting formed an inseparable unit", most probably the reason he said of her Brunnhilde: "There are none like you!"
Wieland Wagner's "Siegfried" live in Bayreuth (1955)Modl is present from the very first note, and, just for a moment, Wagner's idea of the union of man and woman into the perfect human being seems to have become reality. Brunnhilde's visions of fear are then of oppressive intensity, followed by moments of peaceful illusion and elemental power, before she unconditionally relinquishes her divinity. In her autobiography So war mein Weg, Modl confesses that the Siegfried-Brunnhilde interplay was the most difficult role she experienced in the entire Ring: "The part is short, but it is always a third above my register. I had to be particularly careful", something she had to do most of the time. What Wieland Wagner appreciated about her was that "her singing, personality, and acting formed an inseparable unit", most probably the reason he said of her Brunnhilde: "There are none like you!"
881488230031
Bayreuther Festspiele 1955 - Siegfried
Artist: Wagner / Moedl / Windgassen
Format: CD
New: Available $29.99
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Wieland Wagner's "Siegfried" live in Bayreuth (1955)Modl is present from the very first note, and, just for a moment, Wagner's idea of the union of man and woman into the perfect human being seems to have become reality. Brunnhilde's visions of fear are then of oppressive intensity, followed by moments of peaceful illusion and elemental power, before she unconditionally relinquishes her divinity. In her autobiography So war mein Weg, Modl confesses that the Siegfried-Brunnhilde interplay was the most difficult role she experienced in the entire Ring: "The part is short, but it is always a third above my register. I had to be particularly careful", something she had to do most of the time. What Wieland Wagner appreciated about her was that "her singing, personality, and acting formed an inseparable unit", most probably the reason he said of her Brunnhilde: "There are none like you!"
        
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